Posts Tagged ‘computational arts’

Iris

Saturday, February 21st, 2009

I’ve been having a bit of a play with Quartz Composer since I haven’t had a chance to do much in the way of computational arts since uni finished last semester. In doing so, I came up with this, which as you can see became the background of the current website design!

I decided to start off with a halo generator to create a similar effect to a lens flare which I then built on with audio input from the MacBook Pro’s built-in microphone to make it a more interesting effect. Adding in a replicate in space which chances direction over 8 replications gives it the appearance of movement amongst itself, again making it a bit more interesting, but what I really like about this is that it turns it into a colourful iris, which I really quite like.

When the audio is fairly quiet, the iris is small and fades in and out. As the audio volume increases, the iris grows and changes colour.

It can be downloaded here, you are welcome to have a look and play around with it as you like! Just remember, like everything else on this website, it is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Australia License. So anything you do with it must attribute me as the original artist, me, be shared under a share alike license and cannot be used commercially.

This has been done in Quartz Composer for OS X 10.5 Leopard, so it may not work correctly on Tiger. I don’t think I’ve used anything that was new in Leopard, but I’m not sure. So if you are using Tiger, good luck!

I’ve rendered a video which is now up on YouTube to give you an idea of how it looks.

The screen recording here has taken the mic input and used it for the animation. The song used in this recording is “Deflated & Alone (GE Abondoned mix)” by George_Ellinas from http://ccmixter.org/files/George_Ellinas/19174 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

At the moment, it is great for a little while, but unless the music is constantly changing, the interest is lost as it begins to show similar patterns repeating themselves. If you have a look at the Quartz Composition, it’s a pretty simple one really, so I’m sure there is plenty more I can do with it yet to make it that bit more interesting for a bit longer!

Fractalesque

Thursday, November 6th, 2008

Done with Quartz Composer with the intention of replicating the appearance of a Fractal Flame rendered through Scott Draves’ Flam3, except live rendered based on audio input.

This isn’t a fractal, but I think it does re-create the appearance quite well.

The video quality isn’t even close to the live render quality, but it gives you a good idea of it.

The screen recording here has taken the mic input and used it for the animation. The song used in this recording is “August (Reggae Rework)” by el-B from http://ccmixter.org/files/elB/16075 under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 3.0 License.

You can download the Quartz file here, note though that while this will open in Tiger, it will not render correctly, OS X 10.5 Leopard is required for it to run correctly.

It should also be noted that the video above was rendered on a Macbook Pro with an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4ghz with 2gb of RAM and an 8600m GT and it averages 5 frames per second, so to really experience the full potential of this, it needs to run on a Mac with a fairly powerful video card like a Mac Pro, the iMac’s and new Macbook Pro’s should also render it quite nicely.

The reason it is so intensive is because there are a number of iterator and replicate in space patches along with LFO’s and interpolator’s that are affected by both the audio volume peak and the audio spectrum, so depending on the volume and the type of music, the visualisation develops more variation.

Fractals and Influences

Tuesday, August 12th, 2008

Fractals have always particularly appealed to me. They seem chaotic and yet orderly. I actually focussed on this concept in year 12 for my major art work which was selected to be featured in 5 galleries across NSW.

One of my fractals

If you look at my Deviant Art account at all, you’ll notice that it is absolutely full of fractal stills. I also had some big A1 and A2 fractal prints on exhibition, as well as an animation, at a recent inter-university festival between QUT and UQ. So I can easily say that fractals are definitely where my love in art is at. Since I first began experimenting with fractals, there has been one particularly big influence in my work, and that has been the work of Scott Draves aka Spot.

Spot’s work has been of interest to me basically since I began working with fractals and it continues to do so.

He has done a lot of work in fractals and started the Flam3, Electric Sheep and Dreams in High Fidelity projects, all of which are quite influential on my work, both in fractals and in other computational arts.

Not all of his work has been focused on fractals, but many of his idea’s share similarities with them. One example of this are his Dub Visuals which take chaotic still images and morph them, to form other still images in a flow similar to that of the evolution of his fractal animations.

I have previously done fractal animations where they are synced with music, both music performed by another artist and music that I have composed myself. However, this hasn’t been done in real time and has been a long process to setup each portion of the animation and sync it up with the music. Ultimately, I would love to develop a way of rendering fractals, even low quality or low resolution fractals in real-time based on audio input. Basically this would be combining the work I have done previously with the basic concepts of what I did for KKB210 where I did a series of lines and boxes that responded to audio input. The lines one was probably getting close, though ultimately no where near as detailed as I would like it to be, and definitely nowhere near as chaotic and fractal-like as I want.

That is my aim though and hopefully I will get to it sooner or later.

Walking Lines 1

Thursday, July 31st, 2008

Semi-random lines sketchIn the week 2 tutorial for KKB211 – Computational Arts 2, we are looking at doing walking lines in our chosen development tool.

Walking lines are effectively randomly generated paths that the lines follow to create a random image.

I have been using Processing for this particular focus. Thus far I have random lines, however they don’t follow any particular path as of yet. This is effectively still walking lines as the position of the lines is added to and built on. Unfortunately this actually draws a new line every frame that is not necessarily joined to the line from the previous frame.

Have a look at it online here.

The code used to do this is extremely simple and just involves a few random variables based on the width and height of the canvas. I don’t believe this is entirely stochastic because the randoms are tightly controlled, but it is random within its boundaries (unless you want to get into the nitty gritty of it, which I don’t).

The source code is available after the jump.

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KKB211 – Computational Arts 2

Thursday, July 31st, 2008

Last semester this blog was focused on my ongoing computational arts development for my uni work as part of the KKB210 – Computational Arts 1 subject.

This semester, I am moving on to KKB211 – Computational Arts 2, so again, this blog will be used as an online portfolio of my development in the area of computational arts. The aim is to develop a series of works by the end of the semester that can be used as exhibition pieces as part of a computational arts exhibition at QUT Kelvin Grove.

It will also act as a process diary to help my keep track of my development and help me filter out the not so good works so I can focus more on the ones that are worth pursuing.